Seminars & Workshops
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October 2021
CCFS Seminar: Gender Constitutionalism And Reproductive Rights In Asia
Speaker
Prof. Mara Malagodi
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Date
29 October 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 1429
genderstudies@cuhk.edu.hk
Details

Language: English

All are welcome. Free admission

This lecture explores the challenges and opportunities of gender constitutionalism in order to explain the extent to which constitutional law and litigation have provided an adequate venue to advance the equality claims of women and sexual and gender diverse people in the Asian context. In particular, the focus on the constitutional framing of sexual and reproductive rights seeks to illuminate questions about the relationship between gender constitutionalism and national identity. A comparative analysis of the constitutional treatment of sexual and reproductive rights in several Asian jurisdictions reveals a spectrum of approaches, which reflect a combination of nationalist, cosmopolitan, and pragmatic responses to demands for change in these areas. This set of questions will be explored in a comparative perspective and through an in depth case-study, that of Nepal — one of the few jurisdictions in the world in which reproductive rights are explicitly enshrined in the text of the constitution.

 

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October 2021
Computational of Social Science Laboratory (CSSL) Webinar “Inequality (and epidemics) in Cities at High Resolution”
Speaker
Prof. Esteban Moro
Visiiting Professor, MIT Media Lab
Associate Professor,
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Date
20 October 2021 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom, Youtube, Douyu, Bilibili
Details

Zoom
Youtube
Douyu
Bilibili

Abstract
Inequality and segregation are hurting our societies and specially our cities, where the fact that we live apart from other racial, economical or social groups carries tremendous economical and societal consequences. Not only for the people living in poor neighborhoods, but for the region as a whole. Most studies still describe people’s segregation patterns using census areas. However, encounters between people happen in places, not census areas, so our understanding of segregation still relies on very coarse-grained spatial description of how people interact or encounter in our cities. Using a massive dataset of high spatial resolution movements of 4.5 million people in 11 of the largest metropolitan areas in the US we have studied how encounters of different economic groups happen in our cities to determine the economic segregation at the level of places and individual users. We’ve found that some type of places (some restaurantes, education, religious places) are constantly segregated across US, while some other (art exhibits, science museums, hospitals, etc.) are not. Furthermore, we were able to model individual segregation and found that most of the segregation/isolation that individuals experience in their daily lives does not depend on where they live, but on their individual behavioral patterns (type of places visited, social exploration, etc.) We discuss the implications of our results in the context of future development of areas and in the ever-changing evolution of our cities. I will also present recent results about the use of the same modeling and data to understand the COVID-19 epidemic evolution and potential exit strategies in the Boston area.

Biography
Professor Esteban Moro is a researcher, data scientist and professor at MIT Connection Science and Universidad Carlos III (UC3M) in Spain. He has published extensively throughout his career (more than 100 articles) and have led many projects funded by government agencies and/or private companies. Esteban’s work lies in the intersection of big data and computational social science, with special attention to human dynamics, collective intelligence, social networks and urban mobility in problems like viral marketing, natural disaster management, or economical segregation in cities. He has received numerous awards for his research, including the “Shared University Award” from IBM in 2007 for his research in modeling viral marketing in social networks and the “Excellence in Research” Awards in 2013 and 2015 from UC3M. Esteban work appeared in major journals including Nature, PNAS or Science Advances and is regularly covered by media outlets The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, El País (Spain).

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October 2021
Attendance, Completion, and Heterogeneous Returns to College
Speaker
Professor Xiang ZHOU, Harvard University
Date
08 October 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13637033
Details

About the Webinar
A growing body of social science research has investigated whether the economic payoff to a college education is heterogeneous — in particular, whether socioeconomically disadvantaged youth can benefit more from attending and completing college relative to their more advantaged peers. Scholars, however, have employed different analytical strategies and reported mixed findings. To shed light on this literature, I propose a sequential approach to conceptualizing, evaluating, and unpacking the causal effects of college on earnings. By decomposing the total effect of attending a four-year college into several direct and indirect components, this approach not only clarifies the mechanisms through which college attendance boosts earnings, but illuminates the ways in which the postsecondary system may be both an equalizer and a disequalizer. The total effect of college attendance, its direct and indirect components, and their heterogeneity by socioeconomic background are all identified under the assumption of sequential ignorability. I introduce a debiased machine learning (DML) method for estimating all quantities of interest, along with a set of bias formulas for sensitivity analysis. I illustrate the proposed framework and methodology using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort.

About the Speaker
Xiang Zhou is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University. He is also a faculty affiliate at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, and Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. His research broadly concerns inequality, education, causal inference, and computational methods. His work has appeared in American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Journal of Political Economy, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, among other peer-reviewed journals. Before coming to Harvard, Zhou worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University. He received a PhD in Sociology and Statistics from the University of Michigan in 2015.

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September 2021
CCFS Seminar: Desirable Flexibility or Undesirable Instability? Temporal Dimensions of Work and Parental Childcare Time in the United States
Speaker
Professor Yue Qian, University of British Columbia
Date
29 September 2021 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=1228054
Details

ABOUT THE WEBINAR
The ability of parents to devote sufficient time to care work is affected by the temporal conditions of employment. A common assumption in the work-family literature is that workplace flexibility can reduce employment/care time tradeoffs. However, with the increasing bifurcation in the labor market, highly-educated and less-educated workers may have differential experiences of employment hours and job flexibility. We contribute by investigating how a comprehensive set of temporal conditions of work affects parental childcare time, and exploring how these associations vary by the parent’s gender and education. We use nationally representative time diary data from the American Time Use Survey 2017–2018 Leave and Job Flexibilities Module. Temporal dimensions of work include work hours, access to leave, flexible start/end time, short advance notice, types of work shift, and usual days worked. We find that temporal dimensions of paid work are associated with parental childcare time, albeit in gendered ways. In addition, temporal dimensions of job quality widen the educational gradient in mothers’ primary (especially developmental) childcare time. Nevertheless, two temporal aspects of employment seem to narrow the education gradient in fathers’ childcare time, especially routine childcare time. We conclude by discussing the implications of the findings for gender inequality in work and family as well as socioeconomic disparities in child well-being.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Yue Qian is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on social demography, family and work, gender, and health. She has conducted research on North America and East Asia (China in particular). Her research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Gender & Society.

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June 2021
CCFS Seminar: Active Response to Population Aging in China: Rural Vitalization and Toilet Revolution
Speaker
Professor Feng Qiushi, Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology &Centre for Family and Population Research (CFPR), National University of Singapore
Date
24 June 2021 (Thursday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=1103179
Details

About the Webinar
The active response to population aging has recently become a top policy in China; however, how to address the rapid population aging in China especially its significant socioeconomic implications is still calling for more research. We argue that an active response to population aging demands re-configurations of current social policies through penetration and permeation of the perspective of population aging. We examine two major public polices, rural development and toilet revolution, to test this argument. Through simulation-based projection and survey data, we illustrate the huge potential of Introducing the perspective of population to expand the scope and content of policies of rural vitalization and toilet revolution in China.

About the Speaker
Dr. Feng Qiushi received his degree from Duke University and is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore (NUS). He is the Deputy Director of the Centre for Family and Population Research (CFPR) in NUS. His research fields include aging and health, population studies, and economic sociology. His papers were published in major academic journals, such as the Lancet, American Journal of Public Health, and Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences. He is Associate Editor of Asian Population Studies, and Co-editor of the book series of Advance in Studies of Aging and Health. He serves on the editorial board for Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, Journal of Aging and Health, Research on Aging, and Aging and Health Research. His research has been funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNPF), Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE), and Singapore National Medical Research Council (NMRC), and NUS Global Asia Institute (GAI).

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June 2021
U.S. Population Health at A Crossroads
Speaker
Professor Hui ZHENG, The Ohio State University
Date
04 June 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13178964
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About the Webinar

Morbidity and mortality have been increasing among middle-aged and young-old Americans since the turn of the century. In this talk, I will present this unfavorable trend has been extended to cognitive health and younger cohorts, and explore the underlying socioeconomic, psychosocial, physiological, and bio-behavioral mechanisms. More specifically, I will discuss how increasing early life diseases, obesogenic environment, opioid epidemic, depression, declining religion, weakening marital institution, deinstitutionalized labor market, rising income inequality, and medicalization may jointly lead to this health crisis.

About the Speaker

Hui Zheng is an associate professor of sociology at The Ohio State University. His research focuses extensively on social and policy determinants of health, and population process of aging and mortality. His on-going projects include exploring the trend and causes of population health and inequality in the U.S., determinants and consequences of cognitive aging across the life course, nativity disparities in labor market and health, and the role of selection in the health production and aging process. His scholarship has appeared in top sociology, demography, epidemiology and public health journals.

 

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May 2021
Why has the Decline in Gender Segregation Stalled Out? The “Problematic Father” Hypothesis
Speaker
Professor David Grusky, Stanford University
Date
21 May 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=13043475
Details

About the Webinar
During the last decades of the 20th century, the United States underwent a quite encompassing gender revolution, perhaps most notably in the form of a spectacular decline in occupational segregation. But this decline suddenly stalled out in the 21st century. We show that a resurgence in segregation-inducing forms of intergenerational transmission lies behind this development. Far from serving as “impartial conduits,” fathers are disproportionately conveying their male-typed occupations to their sons, a segregative development that accounts for a sizable share of the stalling-out in the trend. This result demonstrates the potential of melding two types of models – segregation and mobility models – that have surprisingly developed quite independently of one another.

About the Speaker
David B. Grusky is Edward Ames Edmonds Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Professor of Sociology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Faculty Fellow at the Center for Population Health Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, coeditor of Pathways Magazine, and member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research addresses such topics as the future of extreme inequality in the United States, recent trends in social mobility, new approaches to reducing poverty and increasing mobility, and new ways to uncover “poverty crises” in the making before it’s too late.

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May 2021
The Salience of Religion under an Atheist State: Implications for Subjective Well-being in Contemporary China
Speaker
Professor Feinian Chen, Professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Maryland
Date
20 May 2021 (Thursday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=1018163
Details

About the Webinar:
We examine the linkage between religious involvement and life satisfaction among adults in contemporary China, a largely non-religious society. Using data from the China Family Panel Studies (2012, 2014 and 2016), we conduct latent class analysis by using four indicators of religious involvement, including membership of religious groups, types of religion, frequency of participation, and evaluation of the importance of religion in life. We classify the sample into four latent classes: (a) the pure non-religious, (b) the non-religious, but with some spirituality, (c) Chinese religion adherent, and (d) organized religion adherent. Results from our fixed-effect models show that Chinese-religion and organized-religion adherents have higher levels of life satisfaction than those with no religious beliefs. Moreover, the disadvantaged groups benefit more from religious involvement in China, as evidenced by the stronger positive effect of religious adherence found among rural residents and individuals in the lowest income quartile. We discuss the benefits of religion both in terms of its public/social and private/intrinsic aspects and situate our findings in the larger social context of China.

About the Speaker:
Feinian Chen is Professor of Sociology and a faculty associate at the Maryland Population Research Center at the University of Maryland. She received her PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2001 and was trained in social demography at the Carolina Population Center. Her research crosscuts a range of areas in demography, family sociology, gender, aging, and quantitative methodology. Her main research interests include women’s work and family, intergenerational relations, population aging and health. Her work has been published in the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Demography, Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Sociological Methods and Research. Her work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Hewlett Foundation. She is actively engaged in research in family transitions, gender dynamics, and their health implications in the diverse contexts of China, India, the Philippines, and the U.S.

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May 2021
How Status Seeking and Social Learning Shape Political Polarization on Social Media: Evidence from a Mixed-Method Field Experiment on Twitter
Speaker
Professor Christopher BAIL, Duke University
Date
05 May 2021 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=12905978
Details

About the Webinar:

Popular narratives about how social media shapes political polarization emphasize echo chambers, foreign misinformation campaigns, and algorithmic radicalization. Yet a careful review of the scientific literature indicates there is surprisingly little evidence that these factors shape political beliefs or inter-group attitudes. Drawing upon multiple field experiments, large-scale analysis of social media data, and longitudinal in-depth interviews, this talk will describe professor Bail’s new book, Breaking the Social Media Prism: How to Make our Platforms Less Polarizing. He will offer a new account of political polarization on social media that emphasizes the role of social identity, status-seeking, and social learning. This talk will explain how social media distorts how people understand what other people think of them, and how this prism-like effect pushes social outcasts towards extremism and mutes moderates who do not depend on social media for their sense of self-worth. Finally, professor Bail will introduce a suite of apps, bots, and other tools designed to help social media users enact research from this research to combat polarization from the bottom up designed within the Duke Polarization Lab. He will also discuss top-down solutions identified via a field experiment he conducted with his colleagues on a new social media platform for scientific research designed to discourage identity-based dynamics in political conversations online.

About the Speaker:

Christopher Bail is Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University, where he directs the Polarization Lab. A Guggenheim and Carnegie Fellow, he studies political extremism on social media using tools from the emerging field of computational social science. He is the author of Breaking the Social Media Prism: How to Make our Platforms Less Polarizing.

 

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April 2021
CUHK CCFS Seminar: Market Merits and Family Virtues: Family Caregivers in the Labor Market of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Haijing Dai, Associate Professor at the Department of Social Work, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Date
14 April 2021 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom (ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=1018163
Details

About the Webinar:
The study explores the gendered effects of family care responsibilities on employment outcomes of job candidates in Hong Kong, in the frameworks of market meritocracy and family moral virtuocracy. The authors adopt a mixed-methods research design, which includes a CV-based survey (n=102), 20 in-depth interviews, and one focus group session of 9 participants with various employers in Hong Kong. The results show that fathers and caregivers of ageing parents receive favorable evaluations and treatments in the combining power of market meritocracy and moral virtuocracy; mothers are evaluated as possessing market merits but are not favored in job offers. Sub-group analyses and qualitative data further demonstrate that market meritocracy fails to function for virtuous female caregivers in employment opportunities, largely due to structural and cultural barriers in the labor market, instead of stereotypes as often believed. This fundamental inequality needs to be addressed with policy interventions.

About the Speaker:
Haijing Dai is an associate professor at the Department of Social Work of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her PhD in social work and sociology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her main research interests include comparative social welfare development, grassroots community organizing, gender and employment, and social change in contemporary China.

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April 2021
Which reconfigurations of Social Movements in the pandemic?
Speaker
Professor Geoffrey PLEYERS, University of Louvain (Belgium)
Date
09 April 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom
(ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6604
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=12650050
Details

About the Webinar:
Around the world, social movements have adapted to unexpected circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic. Following a first article providing a broad overview of social movements role and agency during the first stage of the COVID-19 lockdown, this contribution will examine four evolutions in progressive movements in different countries that have been intensified by the pandemic and the lockdown. (1) Internal solidarity, mutual aid and organizing have taken an increasing space in various movements. (2) The feminization of movements has intensified. (3) The pandemic has fostered a further digitalization of various movements activities that often combines with an increasing investment at the local scale. (4) Social control and state repression have intensified in various countries.

About the Speaker:
Geoffrey Pleyers is FNRS researcher and professor at the Catholic University of Louvain(Belgium). He is the current ISA vice-president for research and the past president of ISA Research Committee 47 “Social movements”. His main books are “Alter-Globalization. Becoming Actors in the Global Age” (Polity, 2011). He has written a series of article on global sociology and social movements in the pandemic in English, Spanish and French, including “The pandemic is a battlefield. Social movements during the COVID-19 lockdown”, “Global Sociology in the Pandemic” and co-edited the book “Social movements and politics in the pandemic”.

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March 2021
Webinar on ‘Education in the Context of Demographic Decline: The Case of China’s Rural School Closure Initiative’
Speaker
Professor Emily Hannum, University of Pennsylvania
Date
26 March 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom
(ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=12477950
Details

About the Webinar
Global trends of fertility decline, population aging, and rural outmigration are creating pressures to consolidate school systems, with the rationale that economies of scale will enable higher quality education to be delivered in an efficient manner, despite longer travel distances for students. Yet, few studies have considered the implications of system consolidation for educational access and inequality, outside of the context of developed countries. This talk will consider the impact of educational infrastructure consolidation on educational attainment using the case of China’s rural primary school closure policies in the early 2000s. The talk will share findings related to gender and ethnic disparities in the implications of consolidation for educational attainment.

About the Speaker
Emily Hannum is Professor of Sociology and Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests are poverty and child welfare, gender and ethnic stratification, and sociology of education. Current projects in China include studies of childhood poverty and inequality, environmental inequality and infant and child welfare, and the impact of large-scale school consolidations on educational attainment. She is also working on comparative analyses of school performance, with attention to disparities associated with family separation, family background, and gender. Recent publications include “Education in East Asian Societies: Postwar Expansion and the Evolution of Inequality” (2019, Annual Review of Sociology, with Hiroshi Ishida, Hyunjoon Park, and Tony Tam); “Differences at the Extremes? Gender, National Contexts, and Math Performance in Latin America” (2020, American Educational Research Journal, with Ran Liu and Andrea Alvarado-Urbina); and “Estimating the Effects of Educational System Consolidation: The Case of China’s Rural School Closure Initiative” (forthcoming, Economic Development and Cultural Change, with Xiaoying Liu and Fan Wang).

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March 2021
Webinar on ‘Global Attitudes towards China: Social Facts and Interpretations’
Speaker
Professor Yu Xie, Princeton University
Date
05 March 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom
(ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=12231805
Details

About the Webinar
How do ordinary people in other countries view China?  Public opinion is a social fact that needs to be documented and interpreted.  In this lecture, Professor Yu Xie will present findings from his empirical research drawing on different data sources that attempts to understand recent trends in attitudes towards China in many countries, particularly the United States.

About the Speaker
Yu Xie is Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor of Sociology and has a faculty appointment at the Princeton Institute of International and Regional Studies, Princeton University. He is also Distinguished Fellow and Adjunct Professor at Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), and Visiting Chair Professor of the Center for Social Research, Peking University. His main areas of interest are social stratification, demography, statistical methods, Chinese studies, and sociology of science. His recently published works include: Marriage and Cohabitation (University of Chicago Press 2007) with Arland Thornton and William Axinn, Statistical Methods for Categorical Data Analysis with Daniel Powers (Emerald 2008, second edition), and Is American Science in Decline? (Harvard University Press, 2012) with Alexandra Killewald. Xie’s main areas of interest are social stratification, demography, statistical methods, Chinese studies and sociology of science. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Academia Sinica and the National Academy of Sciences.

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February 2021
Webinar on “Why does collective protest occur in waves?”
Speaker
Professor Michael Biggs, University of Oxford
Date
26 February 2021 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom
(ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://bit.ly/3ra4B3y
Details

About the Webinar

We are continually surprised that waves of collective protest take us by surprise. In 2020, the killing of one man in Minnesota mobilized half a million Americans to take to the streets on a single day. How have sociologists of social movements explained these upsurges of protest? What regularities can be discerned across different movements and varied political contexts? How does these regularities illuminate the social mechanisms underlying protest? My talk will draw on various historical episodes, from riots in the early 19th century to the protests following the death of George Floyd.

About the Speaker

Professor Michael Biggs is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Oxford and Fellow of St Cross. His research on social movements addresses two different themes: the volatility of protest waves and self-inflicted suffering as protest. He has published in American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, European Sociological Review, Politics and Society, and Mobilization.

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February 2021
Going Solo in China: Prevalence and Characteristics of those who Live Alone, 2010 to 2050
Speaker
Wei-Jun Jean Yeung
Provost’s Chair Professor
Department of Sociology
National University of Singapore
Date
24 February 2021 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom
(ZOOM Link will be sent to registered audience after finished the e-registration.)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 1209
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=898522
Details

Abstract of the talk

The rise in on-person household (OPH) is exerting a powerful influence on many aspects of modern lives. In this seminar, the speaker will show the prevalence and characteristics of those who will live alone in China in the next three decades based on the projections using the ProFamy Extended Cohort-component Method. Distinct from traditional household projection methods, ProFamy is an individual- based macro-simulation method, which simulates the changes of households based on individuals grouped by age, sex, race, marital/union status, parity, and number of co-residing children/parents, rural/urban residence. Results show that OPH will more than double from 2010 to 2050, to hit about 133 million in China by 2050. Approximately one in four Chinese households will have only one resident. The most rapid growth will be among the oldest-olds and the largest solo-living subgroup will be the unmarried urban youth, many of whom are highly educated.

About the speaker

Wei-Jun Jean Yeung is Provost’s Chair Professor of Sociology and Founding Director of the Centre for Family and Population Research at the National University of Singapore. She is a council member of the Asian Population Association and of the International Sociological Association’s Research Committee on Family. She has published extensively in leading journals on population, family, and social inequality and received many prestigious awards. Her recent research includes those that examine the global family changes, productive aging, youth labor markets, migration, marriage, and children’s well-being in Asia.

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January 2021
Understanding Ideal Family Size in China: A Social Contextual Approach
Speaker
Professor Jia Yu, Assistant Professor, Center for Social Research, Peking University
Date
20 January 2021 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=898522
Details

Abstract of the talk

As a reflection of social norms towards childbearing, the ideal number of children is crucial to project the long-term fertility trend. Comparing China and other selected countries, our results show that the average ideal family size is much lower among Chinese women aged between 18 and 49. We also observe high one-child and low 3-or-more-children intentions in China. Capitalizing on the 2018 China Family Panel Study, we examine the effects of macro-level contextual factors on the ideal number of children in China. Results show that the higher economic development level, higher income inequality level, lower total fertility rate, and higher educational competition level will lead to smaller ideal family size. The mediation analysis shows that contextual fertility level and educational pressure are more important in shaping Chinese people’s ideal family size. Our study implies that fertility attitudes should be understood by taking the historical, cultural, and social context into account.

About the speaker

Jia Yu is an assistant professor of Center for Social Research at Peking University in Beijing, China. Her research interest lies in marriage and family, gender inequality, and social stratification in China. Her work about family and gender in China has appeared in journals such as Demography, Population and Development Review, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Chinese Sociological Review.

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December 2020
Professional Flows: Lateral Moves of Law Firm Partners in Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Sida Liu, University of Toronto
Date
09 December 2020 (Wednesday)
Venue
Zoom
Registration
https://bit.ly/36r7dRT
November 2020
Webinar on “Fragmented Authoritarianism Revisited: The Chinese Bureaucracy as a Loosely Coupled System”
Speaker
Professor Xueguang Zhou, Stanford University
Date
20 November 2020 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=11137422
Details

Abstract

In this study I re-examine and reinterpret the prevailing image of fragmented authoritarianism in China in the theoretical framework of “loose coupling” in organizational analysis. In contrast to the rational model of organizations, the “loose coupling” model argues that organizations are often characteristic of a loosely coupled system in which different elements are responsive to one another but in ways that are often delayed, imprecise, and preserve their own identities and autonomy. I identify the institutional mechanisms that cultivate and reproduce the loose-coupling phenomena in the Chinese bureaucracy, despite the tremendous efforts of the Leninist party organization to reshape it into a tightly-coupled system. Empirical evidence from patterns of personnel flow in the large Chinese bureaucracy and fieldwork observations are used to illustrate this line of arguments and to make sense of the observed bureaucratic behaviors.

Biography

Xueguang Zhou is the Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Economic Development, a professor of sociology and a senior fellow at Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. His main area of research is institutional changes in contemporary Chinese society, focusing on Chinese organizations and management, social inequality, and state-society relationships. His ongoing research projects focus on (1) personnel flow and personnel management practice in the Chinese bureaucracy; (2) historical origins and evolution of institutions of governance in China.

November 2020
Brothers and Sisters in China: No Longer the One-child Family
Speaker
Professor Chen Bin-Bin, Fudan University
Date
20 November 2020 (Friday)
Venue
Webinar via ZOOM
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
chendan893@gmail.com
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=502599
Details

Abstract of the talk

Following the end of the one-child-policy in China in 2016 and the gradual relaxation of only-one child per family in selected areas prior to that, family composition and relationship dynamics,  specially siblings relationship within the Chinese familial context has gone through a rapid growth and some significant changes as a result of the introduction of the two-child policy. This policy  hange, leading to the possibility of adding another child into the family may have profound implications on the family system, its functioning and care relations among those living in China.

This presentation will review empirical findings to answer two questions: How do Chinese parents raise two children within a family? Does parents’ own sibling status matter?

About the speaker

Bin-Bin Chen, PhD, is an Associate Professor at Department of Psychology, Fudan University, China. His research interests include various aspects of family relationships and the social and  motional development of child and adolescent. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Fudan Sibling Project (FSP), a longitudinal investigation exploring changes in family functioning and the firstborn’s adjustment after the birth of a second child, which has received funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China. He has publications in journals such as Developmental Psychology, Development and Psychopathology, Journal of Research on Adolescence, and Child Development Perspectives. He was the 2017 recipient of Chinese Young Scholar Award, The 10th Conference for Chinese Psychologist.

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November 2020
Welfare Participation and Depression Symptoms Among Youth in China
Speaker
Shiyou Wu
Assistant Professor, Arizona State University
Date
13 November 2020 (Friday)
Venue
Webinar via ZOOM
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=508945
Details

Abstract of the talk

Background: Although welfare programs in China provide a safety net for low-income people by directly lifting their incomes, receiving benefits has the potential to affect recipients’ mental health because of the demanding and demeaning means-testing application process required by Chinese policy makers. However, little research has
examined the relationship between welfare participation and mental health symptoms-particularly those of depression-among Chinese youth. This study aims to examine the relationship between family participation in the Dibao income-assistance program in China and symptoms of depression among youth.

Methods: This study used a youth sample (n=4,192) of nationally representative data from the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS) survey. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data. Propensity score matching based on the imputed datasets was used to reduce the selection bias of the two groups (Dibao recipients vs non-Dibao). The imputed data was analyzed using aggregated robust multiple regression. The Center for Epidemiological Studies depression scale (CESD-20) was used to measure depression symptoms. In addition, a variety of subgroup analyses were conducted to explore whether the relationship between Dibao participation and symptoms of depression differs significantly by the sociodemographic characteristics.

Results: Youth whose families received Dibao assistance had significantly greater risk for symptoms of depression compared to peers who did not receive assistance. Results also showed that young women- especially young mothers-whose families participated in the Dibao program in rural areas were at significantly higher risk compared to others.

Conclusion and Discussion: The relationship between welfare participation and symptoms of depression varies significantly by the characteristics of youths and their families. As a marker for collective disadvantage and adversity, welfare participation warrants research to study program processes and to distinguish pathways-possibly differentiated by gender-that may elevate risk for depression among Dibao program recipients.

About the speaker

Dr. Shiyou Wu is an Assistant Professor at the School of Social Work at Arizona State University. Wu has been involved in interdisciplinary collaborative research locally, nationally, and internationally, using a social determinants of health framework and a person-in-environment perspective to explore the multi-level (individual, interpersonal, household, community, societal) determinants of youth behavioral health outcomes, especially among youth from impoverished families (e.g., welfare recipients).

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October 2020
CUHK Sociology webinar: Social Networks and Family Change in Japan Revisited, by Prof. Martin Piotrowski
Speaker
Prof. Martin Piotrowski,
The University of Oklahoma.
Date
29 October 2020 (Thursday)
Venue
Webinar via ZOOM
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://bit.ly/3jYMk68
Details

Abstract

Using data from the 2000 and 2009 National Surveys of Family and Economic Conditions in Japan, (N = 2,202) we examine the relationship between knowing someone engaged in “innovative” family behaviors and attitudes toward such behaviors. We extend existing research on this topic in three ways: 1) by adding a longitudinal component that allows us to estimate a fixed-effects model that controls out the influence of unmeasured, time-invariant factors likely to be related to both knowing and attitudes, 2) examining whether know behaviors themselves, or relationship domains, are the more salient predictor of attitudes, and 3) by focusing more explicitly on gender differences. We find that, net of unmeasured time-invariant characteristics, knowing a friend or co-worker who engaged in innovative family behaviors is associated with a significant change toward more non-traditional attitudes, and more so for women than for men.

Biography

Martin Piotrowski is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Oklahoma. He received his PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2006 and was trained at the Carolina Population Center (CPC). He is a demographer specializing in quantitative methods and conducts research on aspects of rural-to-urban migration, marriage and fertility, and familial and gender attitudes especially in parts of Asia. He has done research in countries experiencing large-scale socioeconomic change including Thailand, Nepal, China, and Japan and has explored topics involving inter-generational and family relations, household structures, and life course transitions. He has published widely in sociology, family, and demography journals including Social Science Research, Journal of Marriage and Family, Population Studies, European Journal of Population, and others.

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September 2020
Postgraduate Seminar Series: How And Why Ethnographic Interviews Work
Speaker
Jeffrey Guhin
Assistant Professor At The University Of California, Los Angeles

Rachel Rinaldo
Associate Professor At The University Of Colorado Boulder
Date
25 September 2020 (Friday)
Venue
Zoom
Enquiries

fjolivos@link.cuhk.edu.hk
Details

Jeffrey Guhin Assistant Professor at The University Of California, Los Angeles Rachel Rinaldo Associate Professor at The University Of Colorado Boulder September 25, 2020 (Friday) 11:00am HKT Via Zoom For Research Postgraduate Students (Mphil/Phd) Of Our Department Contact us at fjolivos@link.cuhk.edu.hk Or kelvinlam@link.cuhk.edu.hk if you are interested to join the seminar. We look forward to meeting you.

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September 2020
Political Standing and National Identity of Mainland Chinese Immigrants in Hong Kong
Speaker
Zhuoni Zhang
Associate Professor of Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences
City University of Hong Kong
Date
18 September 2020 (Friday)
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=508945
August 2020
Postgraduate Workshop: Organizational Approaches to Sociological Topics
Speaker
Prof. Xueguang Zhou
Date
10 August 2020 (Monday)
Details

Xueguang Zhou is Professor of Sociology and Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Economic Development and FSI Senior Fellow at Stanford University. His main area of research is institutional changes in contemporary Chinese society, focusing on Chinese organizations and management, social inequality, and state-society relationships.

Organizational approaches to social phenomena have become a major research paradigm since the 1980s, partly because the field of organizational research has matured, with rich theoretical models and analytical tools accumulated, and partly because contemporary society has become increasingly structured by formal organizations and are hence subject to organizational analysis.

This workshop introduces organizational approaches to selected, substantive areas of sociological inquiry. The goal of this workshop is to focus on some classical ideas in the literature and introduce the kind of research issues, theoretical models, and analytical concepts in organizational research and their applications in selected areas.

Sessions

1.Seminar 1. Organizational approaches: An overview. August 10, 9am – 12pm HK

2.Seminar 2. Organizational approaches to state building & bureaucracy. August 12, 9am – 12pm HKT

3.Seminar 3. Organizational approach to stratification & inequality. August 14, 9am – 12pm HKT.

4.Seminar 4. Organizational approach to social movements.  August 17, 9am – 12pm HKT

Practical Sessions. Before 4 September 2020, exact dates yet to be confirmed.

1.Project preparation and consultation

2.Project presentation and discussion

Eligibility

RPg students of Department of Sociology, CUHK

 

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June 2020
Adolescent Gender Attitudes and Adulthood Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study in Taiwan
Speaker
Professor Ran Liu
Department of Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date
19 June 2020 (Friday)
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=508945
May 2020
The Household Structure Transition in China: 1982-2015
Speaker
Professor Ting Li
School of Sociology and Population Studies, Renmin University of China
Date
15 May 2020 (Friday)
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=508945
May 2020
When Family Property Becomes Individual Property: Intrahousehold Property Ownership and Women’s Well-Being in China
Speaker
Professor Emma Xiaolu ZANG
Yale University
Date
08 May 2020 (Friday)
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=502599
January 2020
Talk on ” Timing and Duration of Employing Live-in Domestic Helpers among Hong Kong Families” Organized by Centre for Chinese Family Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Adam Cheung
Hong Kong Baptist University
Date
17 January 2020 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943-1209
October 2019
Talk on ” Standoff and Improvisation in Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement” Organized by Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Ming-sho Ho
Sociology at National Taiwan University
Date
18 October 2019 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=8136928
August 2019
Talk on ” It Could Be Otherwise, in times of trouble” Organized by Video Analysis, Science, and Technology (VAST) Research Group, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Steve Woolgar
Science and Technology Studies at Linköping University and Emeritus Professor of Marketing at the University of Oxford
Date
26 August 2019 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=7855560
June 2019
Talk on “Beyong Human Ecology : Understanding the Mental Costs of Large Urban Neighbourhoods in China” Organized by Research Centre on Migration and Mobility and co-organized by Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Qiang Fu
Department of Sociology, the University of British Columbia
Date
21 June 2019 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
June 2019
Talk on “外包、中介、數字控制與移民家政工人的職業素養 —— 對中國家政行業的個案考察” Organized by Research Centre on Migration and Mobility and co-organized by Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
劉林平教授
南京大學社會學院
Date
19 June 2019 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
June 2019
Postgraduate Seminar Series 2018/19 “Migrant Mothering in Transition: The Maternal Narratives and Practices of Two Generations of Rural-Urban Migrant Mothers in China”
Speaker
Professor Yinni Peng
Hong Kong Baptist University
Date
11 June 2019 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
May 2019
Talk on “Cultural Sources of Household Income Equality in East Asia”
Speaker
Professor Arthur Sakamoto
Cornerstone Faculty Fellow Professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas
Date
16 May 2019 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
April 2019
Talk on “Unpacking the Border, Global Capitalism, Social Conflicts, and the Contemporary Geographic Turmoil”
Speaker
Professor Sandro Mezzadra
Political Theory, University of Bologna
Date
25 April 2019 (Thursday)
Venue
Room 313, Humanities Building, New Asia College
April 2019
Talk on “There is no place like home : Taiwanese Married Women in Hong Kong”
Speaker
Professor Lan-Hung Nora Chiang
Dept of Geography, National Taiwan University
Date
03 April 2019 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
March 2019
Seminar on “Reciprocity and Heterogeneity: The Role of Parenting and Child Behaviors in Children’s Academic Achievement”
Speaker
Professor Dohoon Lee
Department of Sociology, Yonsei University
Date
18 March 2019 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
March 2019
Talk on “Trends in Social Closure in Post-Revolution China” Co-organized by Department of Sociology, Research Centre on Migration and Mobility and Centre for Chinese Family Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Yu XIE
Princeton University
Date
15 March 2019 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
February 2019
Talk on “Making Sense of Digital Money : Transactional practices and social interactions”
Speaker
Dr. Mark Perry
Brunel University London
Date
27 February 2019 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=6816366
February 2019
Talk on “Emigration and Politics: European Parties and Citizens Abroad”
Speaker
Dr. Tudi Kernalegenn
Université de Louvain (Belgium)
Date
18 February 2019 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=6716580
February 2019
HKU-CUHK Joint Sociological Forum Series (Spring 2019) “Action Chains as Networks in Practice: Informal Help and Medical Care Access in China”
Speaker
Professor Cheris Shun-ching Chan
University of Hong Kong
Date
15 February 2019 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603-7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=6660169
February 2019
Talk on ” Young Adults Out- Migration and Health Inequality among Older Parents in Rural China” Co-organised by Centre for Chinese Family Studies (HKIAPS) and Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Speaker
Professor Zhen Liu
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Date
14 February 2019 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 39431209
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
January 2019
Talk on “慾望與尊嚴:婚外保養與轉型期中國的親密關係倫理”
Speaker
Professor Suowei Xiao (肖索未教授)
Beijing Normal University
Date
29 January 2019 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943-6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
January 2019
Workshop on “Social support and protection for migrant domestic workers under transnationalism”
Date
05 January 2019 (Saturday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943-6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
More details
December 2018
Talk on “The Origins of Globalization Revisited: The Case of Clinton’s U-Turn on US-China Trade, 1993-94”
Speaker
Professor Ho-fung Hung
The Johns Hopkins University
Date
03 December 2018 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 2603 7619
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
December 2018
Seminar on “Changing Norms of Eldercare Responsibilities across Generational Cohorts in the Context of Chinese Social Transformation”
Speaker
Professor Jiehua Lu
Professor of Sociology, Peking University
Date
03 December 2018 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
November 2018
Seminar on “Rights Make Might: Global Human Rights and Minority Social Movements in Japan “
Speaker
Professor Kiyoteru Tsutsui
Professor of Sociology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Date
06 November 2018 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=5906456
September 2018
Seminar on “Do Immigrant Earnings Benefit from Ethnic Concentration?”
Speaker
Dr. Xingang Wang
The University of Auckland
Date
21 September 2018 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
August 2018
Seminar on ” The Weight Wage Penalty: A Mechanism Approach to Discrimination”
Speaker
Professor Tobias Wolbring
Professor of Economic Sociology, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nürnberg
Date
08 August 2018 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=5213241
June 2018
Lecture on “Gendered Age Preferences for Potential Partners: A Mixed-Methods Study among Online Daters in Shanghai”
Speaker
Prof. Yue Qian, Assistant Professor of University of British Columbia
Date
13 June 2018 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
May 2018
Lecture on “Transition of Rural-Urban Migration in Mainland China”
Speaker
Professor Feng Ren, The Institute for Population Studies, Xiamen University
Professor Zixi Liu, Department of Sociology and Social Work, Xiamen University
Date
21 May 2018 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc2oHtzKuLvkxJqOyTzhaZZFt87SYgI2vETXFz265bBxZjYZQ/viewform
May 2018
Seminar on “One Nation, Two Chinas, and Three Ways of Being Gay: A Sociological Analysis of Young Gay Male Identities in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Mainland China”
Speaker
Professor Travis S.K. Kong
Department of Sociology, University of Hong Kong
Date
11 May 2018 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXIL7fn3XJavxiQJklbDcnEoasMF_ya9bwF_nHefhfciO-3A/viewform
May 2018
Seminar on “Labour Migration across ASEAN”
Speaker
Professor Arisman
Associate Professor at Department of Development Economics, The State Islamic University (UIN), Jakarta
Date
02 May 2018 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSetMApMiV_lFqkiB0SBoaRFsLRK6NRuqYIa1qbRCSbXSpA6JQ/viewform
April 2018
Seminar on “Raising Global Families: Parenting, Immigration and Class in Taiwan and the US”
Speaker
Professor Pei-Chia Lan
Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Director of Global Asia Research Center at National Taiwan University
Date
17 April 2018 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1hIeqZ6UZ3IgYGPvE_0ttEg-0Rle_XdwIll1N2NkXQc8/viewform?edit_requested=true
March 2018
Seminar on “Migrant Margins: The street life of discrimination”
Speaker
Professor Suzanne Hall
Co-director of the Cities Programme and Associate Professor in Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Date
27 March 2018 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfCchxv3e4fmwDmhMzzGfEuG_ihwDl-FUdoNUInawH09UKZSw/viewform
March 2018
Seminar on “Migrant Skill Mismatches and Impacts on Earnings”
Speaker
Professor Sholeh Maani
Professor of Economics at the University of Auckland
Date
16 March 2018 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe-ydOlwmZlXNs4Tz5dZJzbvbs2XuDPlrRQCFhawmswSK3hjg/viewform
March 2018
Seminar on “Work Unit Housing Compounds, Social Connection and Dis-Connection in Urban China under Mao”
Speaker
Professor Danching Ruan
Department of Sociology, Hong Kong Baptist University
Date
01 March 2018 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
February 2018
Seminar on “A Mosaic Temporality: New Dynamics of the Gender and Marriage System in Contemporary Urban China”
Speaker
Professor Yingchun Ji
Eastern Scholar Professor, Professor of Sociology, School of Sociology and Political Science, Shanghai University
Date
26 February 2018 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
January 2018
Seminar on “Accent And Ethnic Minorities’ Social Interaction”
Speaker
Professor Irena Kogan
Chair in Comparative Sociology, University of Mannheim
Date
24 January 2018 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference Room of Institute of Future Cities Room 406B-1, 4/F, Wong Foo Yuan Bldg., CUHK (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
January 2018
Postgraduate Seminar Series: Changes in the Relationship between Individuals and Organizations
Speaker
Professor Jing ZHANG (張靜教授)
Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology, Peking University
Date
12 January 2018 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
December 2017
Seminar on “Languages as Boundary Ma(r)ker: Dignity, Motherhood, and Everyday Multiculturalism” Co-organizers by Centre of Urban History, Culture and Media, Institute of Future Cities and Gender Studies Programme
Speaker
Dr Isabelle Cheng
Senior Lecturer, University of Portsmouth, UK
Date
20 December 2017 (Wednesday)
Venue
Rm 406B, Wong Foo Yuan Building, Chung Chi College, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
October 2017
Seminar on “Living Arrangements and Old-Age Psychological Health: Evidence from Myanmar, Vietnam, and Thailand”
Speaker
Professor Bussarawan Puk Teerawichitchainan
School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University
Date
26 October 2017 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
October 2017
Talk on “A Century of Migrations and Global Political Uncertainties”
Speaker
Professor Fatos Tarifa
Rector, University of New York Tirana
Date
20 October 2017 (Friday)
Venue
Rm 505, 5/F, Esther Lee Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
October 2017
Seminar on “Controlling risk: rights, legitimacy and uncertainty”
Speaker
Professor John Pratt
Professor of Criminology at the Institute of Criminology, Victoria University of Wellington
Date
20 October 2017 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
September 2017
Seminar on “Hyper-Selectivity and the Remaking of Culture: Understanding Asian American Achievement”
Speaker
Professor Min Zhou (周敏)
Professor of Sociology & Asian American Studies at UCLA
Date
22 September 2017 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
June 2017
Seminar on ” The Structure of Protest Cycles: Contagion and Cohesion in South Korea’s Democracy Movement”
Speaker
Professor Paul Y. Chang
Harvard University
Assistant Professor of Sociology at National Taiwan University
Date
19 June 2017 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
May 2017
Public Lectures “Women, Work, and Marriage: Challenges of Gendered Social Mobility in Urban China” Jointly organized by Gender Studies Programme, Gender Research Centre & Research Centre on Migration and Mobility, CUHK
Speaker
Professor Arianne M. Gaetano
Associate Professor, Director of Women's Studies Program at Aburn University
Date
23 May 2017 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
May 2017
Public seminar on “Occupational Characteristics and Variation in Motherhood Wage Penalty”
Speaker
Professor Janet Chen-Lan KUO
Assistant Professor of Sociology at National Taiwan University
Date
10 May 2017 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
April 2017
Talk on “Socio-Economic Integration of Early Professional Hong Kongers in Taiwan”
Speaker
Professor Lan-hung Nora CHIANG
Professor Emerita at Department of Geography, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
Date
06 April 2017 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6271
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
March 2017
Public Seminar: What Women’s Movements do for the World
Speaker
Professor Jo Reger
Editor, Gender & Society
Professor of Sociology and Director of Women and Gender Studies, Oakland University
Date
31 March 2017 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeG4488ji7OaIUz-XqvbUHDN6rJZRFBBFVxcQmtjcphw2dPqQ/closedform
March 2017
Wednesday Gender Seminar: How Can Women’s Movements Change Society? (And How to Study Them)
Speaker
Professor Jo Reger
Editor, Gender & Society
Professor of Sociology and Director of Women and Gender Studies, Oakland University
Date
29 March 2017 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScaW--YvV3F59c8TfwzhPLxj1jUDbZusfNla6UbA_OYYwvReA/closedform
March 2017
Talk on “Migration Time: Transnational Working Bodies under South Korea’s Visa Regime”
Speaker
Professor June Hee Kwon
Department of East Asian Studies, New York University
Date
14 March 2017 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6603
rcmm@cuhk.edu.hk
March 2017
Seminar on “Organised Indeterminacy: The Social Processes Underpinning Medical Authority”
Speaker
Professor Daniel Menchik
Michigan State University
Date
10 March 2017 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
February 2017
Talk on “Marriage Migration, Migrant Precarity, and Social Reproduction in Asia”
Speaker
Professor Nicola Piper
Professor of Sociology, University of Sydney
Date
21 February 2017 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
January 2017
社會學就業講座
Date
24 January 2017 (Tuesday)
Venue
香港中文大學 信和樓 4 樓 422 室 (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd3xWrhqMhXreftVjmH5-gY1qAD1njK7kiaTRQylhpg8nzGjA/viewform
January 2017
Talk on “The Significance of Guanxi in China Today”
Speaker
Professor Yanjie BIAN, University of Minnesota and Xi’an Jiaotong University
Date
13 January 2017 (Friday)
Venue
Conference Room 422, 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
December 2016
Workshop on “Migration Studies” Co-organized by The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)
Date
07 December 2016 (Wednesday)
Venue
Conference Room 422, 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
December 2016
CUHK-Xi’an Jiaotong University Workshop on Migration Studies
Date
06 December 2016 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference Room 422, 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
November 2016
公開講座:「太陽花運動後的台灣公民社會 vs. 雨傘運動後的香港公民社會」
Speaker
范雲教授 (國立台灣大學社會學系副教授)
陳健民教授 (香港中文大學社會學系副教授)
Date
10 November 2016 (Thursday)
Venue
香港中文大學 信和樓 4 樓 422 室 (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
October 2016
Talk on “His, Her and Their Marriages”: Privatization of Marriage and Re-verticalization of Kinship in Shanghai
Speaker
Professor Deborah Davis
Professor of Sociology, Yale University
Date
21 October 2016 (Friday)
Venue
Conference Room 422, 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
September 2016
Talk on “An Illustrated Theory of Capital Conversion” or “When Do Ethnic Social Capitals Become Ethnic Cultural Capitals”
Speaker
Professor Bonnie Erickson
Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto
Date
30 September 2016 (Friday)
Venue
Conference Room 422, 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
September 2016
Talk on “The Reality of Occupations: From Census Data to Local Experience and Back Again.”
Speaker
Professor Andrew Abbott
Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago
Date
09 September 2016 (Friday)
Venue
Conference Room 422, 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6606
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
April 2016
UG Student Forum 2016
Date
13 April 2016 (Wednesday)
Venue
香港中文大學信和樓 4 樓 422 室 (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 1486
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfIivBN1qjx1V9r-CwnJgRzd50Jc2bdN1V2_Jv3g9wfMWkeoQ/viewform?c=0&w=1
April 2016
公開講座:「從野百合、太陽花到台灣新政治:在理想與現實之間」
Speaker
范雲教授
台大社會系副教授,社會民主黨創黨召集人
Date
07 April 2016 (Thursday)
Venue
香港中文大學 信和樓 4 樓 422 室 (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6606
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1v8wjww5374xoX5L-8kKySS2zrRL8BkdXmu5NTtHzvKQ/viewform?edit_requested=true
April 2016
社會學系畢業生就業講座 -「社會學‧發展無限」
Date
01 April 2016 (Friday)
Venue
香港中文大學信和樓 4 樓 422 室 (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 1486
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeBPLV1uKt3wOppKoH4mL3ybQat666QE8qAT0ZeIo4Zc7wXKQ/viewform?c=0&w=1
March 2016
中國社會科學院學者講座系列-「信任與接納:基於全國抽樣調查的分析」
Speaker
王俊秀教授
中國社會科學院社會學研究所社會心理學研究室主任
Date
10 March 2016 (Thursday)
Venue
香港中文大學信和樓 4 樓 422 室 (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
March 2016
Seminar on “Evaluating Distributional Differences in Income Inequality: Capturing Glass-Ceiling/Floor Effects”
Speaker
Professor Tim Liao
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Date
03 March 2016 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
February 2016
Public Seminar on “Declines in Marriage Across the Globe: The Importance of Socioeconomic Inequality”
Speaker
Professor Kelly Raley
Editor of Journal of Marriage and Family
Date
26 February 2016 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Map)
Enquiries
(852) 3943 6628
sociology@cuhk.edu.hk
Registration
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdpsBUIQF-2g40ybgA4lh3B8vPT_ZnSroHau0aUc6jHaPiVMg/viewform
July 2015
Parent talk
Speaker
Professor Stephen Chiu
Date
04 July 2015 (Saturday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Parent Academy of Hong Kong Education City co-organised a Parent Seminar: Liberal Studies in Everyday Life with Hong Kong Liberal Studies Teachers’ Association on 4 July 2015. Prof. Stephen Wing-kai CHIU of our Department gave a talk entitled “Do’s and Don’ts for Parents of Liberal Studies Students” during the seminar. The talk was delivered to parents to explain the role of them in their children’s Liberal Studies learning. Around 150 parents participated in this seminar and shared their experiences with Prof. Chiu.

January 2015
Talk on “Do East and West German Life Courses Really Differ? Statistically Assessing Differences between Sets of Life Course Sequences”
Speaker
Professor Tim Liao
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Date
12 January 2015 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
January 2015
Talk on “Sociology Distinguished Lecture: Family Transitions in China since 1949”
Speaker
Professor Martin K. Whyte, Harvard University
Professor Deborah Davis, Yale University
Date
08 January 2015 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

The Department is privileged to have invited Prof. Martin K. Whyte, John Zwaanstra Professor of International Studies and Sociology at Harvard University, and Prof. Deborah Davis, Professor of Sociology at Yale University, as guest speakers for the Sociology Distinguished Lecture entitled “Family Transitions in China since 1949” on 8 January 2015. Prof. Whyte presented a lecture on “Understanding Family Change Patterns in the PRC”. Prof. Davis presented a lecture on “Sociologists Look East: How Empirical Evidence on Chinese Families Can Challenge Dominant Assumptions and Paradigms in the Study of Marriage and the Family”. The lecture drew an audience of over 100 participants.

November 2014
Talk on “Interpretive Approaches to Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences”
Speaker
Professor Salvatore Babones
Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney
Date
27 November 2014 (Thursday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Prof. Salvatore Babones, Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney, visited the Department and presented a talk on “Interpretive Approaches to Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences” on 27 November 2014. Prof. Babones also conducted a workshop on “Publishing in International Journals in Sociology” for postgraduate students of the Department on 2 December 2014.

October 2014
Seminar on “Sociology and Genomic Research”
Speaker
Professor Guang Guo
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Date
13 October 2014 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Prof. Guang Guo, Dr. George and Alice Welsh Distinguished Professor of Sociology at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, visited the Department and presented a public seminar on “Sociology and Genomic Research” on 13 October 2014.

September 2014
Workshop on “Cybercrime: Evolution and International Response”
Speaker
Professor Peter Grabosky
Emeritus Professor at Australian National University
Date
19 September 2014 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Department of Sociology organized a workshop entitled “Cybercrime: Evolution and International Response” on 19 September 2014. Prof. Peter Grabosky, Emeritus Professor at Australian National University gave a presentation on “The Evolution of Cybercrime, 2004-2014”, and Prof. Gregor Urbas, Associate Professor of Law at University of Canberra, gave a presentation on “Responding to Cyber-Attacks: The role of International and Domestic Law”. Dr. Laurie Lau, Honorary Research Fellow of the Pearl River Delta Social Research Centre of the Department , served as the moderator of the workshop.

September 2014
Seminar on “Too Small to Regulate? : The Crisis and the Failure of Shareholder Value”
Speaker
Professor Frank Dobbin
Professor of Sociology at Harvard University
Date
05 September 2014 (Friday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Prof. Frank Dobbin, Professor of Sociology at Harvard University, visited the Department and presented a public seminar on “Too Small to Regulate?: The Crisis and the Failure of Shareholder Value” on 5 September 2014.

September 2014
Seminar on “The Quest for Equality and Respect: Responding to Stigmatization and Discrimination in United States, Brazil and Israel”
Speaker
Professor Michèle Lamont
Professor of Sociology and African and African American Studies at Harvard University
Date
02 September 2014 (Tuesday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Prof. Michèle Lamont, Professor of Sociology and African and African American Studies and Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard University, visited the Department and presented a public seminar on “The Quest for Equality and Respect: Responding to Stigmatization and Discrimination in United States, Brazil and Israel” on 2 September 2014.

August 2014
Talk on “China’s Rural-Urban Migration and Children’s Access to Compulsory Education: Policy Evolution and Consequences”
Speaker
Professor Lingxin Hao
Johns Hopkins University
Date
11 August 2014 (Monday)
Venue
Conference room (Room 422), 4/F, Sino Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Details

Prof. Lingxin Hao, Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, visited the Department and presented a talk on “China’s Rural-Urban Migration and Children’s Access to Compulsory Education: Policy Evolution and Consequences” on 11 August 2014

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